Power Up Your Business Card

I am going to make a grand assumption…

I bet you have a stack of other people’s business cards somewhere around your workspace that you kind-of, sort-of, should really, do something with—if only you knew what/where/when/how and/or had the time to do it.

Am I right?

We all end up with this business card dilemma for two specific reasons.

  1. We don’t have a system in place to deal with incoming cards.
  2. You’ve been given business cards that are uninspiring and have no clear call to action

So, what do you do?

First: Business Cards = Jobs

So here’s the thing—some of those cards could belong to people who would be great connections for your job search.   AND if their cards end up lying around on your desk, YOUR cards might end up lying around on theirs!

Second: Each Business Card Deserves a Follow-Up Message

For every card you receive, you should make an effort to do some sort of follow-up with that person. This can be as simple as sending an email or give them a call. My idea of a good follow-up message goes something like this:

Hi [put their first name in here],

It was great to meet you at [wherever you met them], and I’d love to keep in touch. I’m going to send you a LinkedIn request, and I hope that you will accept.

[If there was something specific you talked about, refer to it here. Maybe send them a link to an article on the subject they might find interesting]

Take care, and I look forward to seeing you again soon.

[Your name]

Third: Make Sure Your Business Cards have a Clear Call to Action

If you’re tired of receiving business cards from other people that are uninspiring and give you no reason to follow-up, then learn from their mistakes.

Make sure your business cards provide a clear call to action so the receiver actually wants to follow-up.

Here’s what you should keep in mind when creating your business cards:

ALWAYS use double sided business cards.

On one side of your card, put your contact information—you don’t know how people will want to connect with you— so that means including your email, mobile phone number, and links to your Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook Page, website, etc.

Now, on the BACK of your card, put your call to action (CTA).  A CTA is simply what you are looking for.  The CTA will provide guidance to your new contact making it easier for them to help you.    You can also create a Quick Response Code (QR) that will create a smart phone readable scan connecting to your online resume, Y-Tube video, blog or other online content that will support your job search.

The Bottom Line: Now … get to it!

Now that you know how to use your business cards (and those you collect from others) to power your job search I urge you to put the information to work go from the business card to the job.


Can you really find a job on Facebook?

Can you really find a job on Facebook?

While LinkedIn represents a pure play on next generation online recruiting, Facebook is instead seeding numerous markets. Facebook has massive user activity and social data, but is still relegated to personal use and content sharing. Everyone knows that Facebook will look to disrupt major online marketplaces (recruiting, auctions, eCommerce, search) etc… but for right now, it seems much more focused on acquiring users and building traffic.

Facebook itself has not focused on recruiting, which leaves a lucrative white space open to technology startups. Recruiting technology companies are fighting to gain market share and traction before either: A. Facebook develops its own recruiting technology or B. Facebook entirely concedes professional networking to LinkedIn.

Technology companies approach recruiting with Facebook in very different ways. Each of these five types of technology have been receiving heavy interest and investment lately:

  • Social distribution: Recruiting technology that focuses on delivering the job through a normal channel, such as a career jobsite or job board, but then enables social distribution through Facebook and other services. These companies use the social graph of the employees at the company recruiting. For example, a job is posted through the company website and then “pushed” out through the company Facebook page and individual employee accounts for magnified and focused distribution.
  • Metadata Layering: Facebook has tons of personal data, but for professional data, it’s about as useful as eharmony. Entire companies are springing up based on the Facebook social graph, which focus on overlaying additional professional data (or metadata) on top of Facebook. These services trust that Facebook will be the de facto standard for user authentication on the web – all that is needed to recruit with Facebook is to add a professional contextual layer.
  • Recruitment Ad Distribution: Facebook is an incredibly efficient advertising platform. Services such as Facebook sponsored stories “socialize” advertisements through the endorsement of friends. These personal ads coming from a user’s own friends seem like an ideal platform for job referrals and recruitment marketing. Some recruiting technology companies have focused on Facebook advertising – delivering efficient ways to measure recruitment metrics, spend, and channel performance.
  • Facebook Page Optimization: Most large companies have begun using their Facebook page as a primary vehicle for branding and company communication. Delivering employment branding and actual jobs through the Facebook page is an obvious strategy – but one that requires expertise that most HR departments don’t have internally. Some recruiting technology companies have focused on the delivery of optimized Facebook pages for recruitment: improving employment brand, measuring engagement, building fans, and efficiently serving geo-specific jobs.
  • Talent Communities: Facebook provides an ideal way to build highly focused and engaged groups of people. However, it’s a bit harder to engage a large group in a systematized way with recruitment campaigns. Additionally, Facebook provides administrators of pages and groups with little user data. Some companies are focused on methods and technology to build large pools of focused talent to meet the recruitment needs of clients.

The potential market for recruitment on the word’s most popular website is obviously staggering. Investment dollars are flocking to support technology startups that promise efficiency of recruiting with Facebook. The incredible success of LinkedIn’s IPO will no doubt increase venture capital interest in social recruitment technology.

The Bottom Line

Unless Facebook itself becomes a job board, the opportunity for startups to leverage its massive social graph for recruiting is clear. Of course, it is not a zero sum game – more than one technological method for recruiting with Facebook may gain traction. Additionally, if any one particular startup emerges as the clear winner, they may include all of these types of services in their products.   Smart Job Searchers should center their social media job finding activities to LinkedIn until a Facebook solution comes online.

Using Your Smart Phone To Find A Job?

Smart Phone Recruiting

Change is ever-present in today’s world of recruitment. First, it was the paperless office, then it was Internet jobs boards, and, just as we got used to that, along came social recruitment. And, while many of us are still catching our breath with social media recruitment, along comes the next big transformational event in recruiting: Mobile Recruitment. And, just in case any of you think that Mobile Recruiting it isn’t officially ‘here’, you should be aware that in  September last year in San Francisco, there occurred the first annual mobile recruiting conference of its kind, sponsored and attended by all the major players, including the big two of Monster and Careerbuilder. Big players are thinking that mobile is, well… big.


5 Smart Phone Recruiting Apps

Last week tech expert Dean Wright showcased 5 Smart Phone Recruiting  Apps in his LinkedIn blog. Take a look at what is coming to a Smart Phone near you.

1.) HireVue

This iPhone app allows recruiters to design interview questionnaires on the phone and then send them to candidates. Candidates can then view the questions and then video their answers to the questions at their own convenience and send them back to the employer. The employer can share the video interviews with other managers too. This is great tool which brings interviewing into the modern age of mobile phones and mobile people.

2.) Jobscience

This is a powerful iPhone app from Force.com which gives you applicant tracking capabilities on your mobile phone. Recruiters can invite candidates to submit their resumes digitally and the resumes will be instantly parsed and/or can be searched through to enable you to quickly identify suitable candidates. Resumes can be shared by email, SMS, etc… This is a great tool to take around a job fair or networking event.

3.) BullHorn

Like Jobscience, BullHorn is a mobile phone based applicant tracking system. Bullhorn offers their software on multiple platforms, e.g. iPhone, Android, Windows, and Blackberry. It has solid CRM features that differentiate it from more consumer oriented products.

4.) Tungle

This is a meeting scheduling tool that allows recruiters to quickly and easily schedule interviews with candidates. Its simple; recruiter sends invite, candidates reply and it automatically updates both party’s calendars. The system automatically syncs with all the main Mobile OS calendars.

5.) Google Power Search

This is an app which will make it easier for recruiters to search the web for candidates. The apps present a simple graphical interface which you can use to search the web for candidates, meaning that you do not have to use complicated boolean search strings to perform that task anymore.

The Bottom Line

Surprisingly, even though mobile recruiting is officially ‘here’ and that nearly 70% of jobseekers would like to use their phone for career related purposes, only 3% of employers have a mobile job app. With demand for mobile recruiting being so high and supply being so low the adoption of these technologies is coming ….Fast!!!!  The Smart Job Searcher must stay one step ahead of this revolution in recruiting.  I would recommend  you subscribe to sites like Mashable and by means keep reading my blog The Smart Job Search for updates.

Are You A Facebook Idiot?

No one wants to be an idiot, especially when it comes to Facebook where there’s the chance for thousands of people, including recruiters and potential employers, to see it.

I have been on Facebook since 2007 and have made my share of mistakes that have made me look like an idiot.  The social media and email marketing experts at Constant Contact recently compiled a list of mistakes that can make you look like an idiot on Facebook.  And so, as a public service, the Smart Job Blog presents the Top 5 Things That Can Make You Look An Idiot on Facebook.

Are you doing any of these things?

5. Not monitoring your Facebook Page.  When someone visits your page, are they going to find it full of links from Facebook spammers inviting your fans to college night at the local bar of to click to win a free iPad?

4. Liking your own post. Really?  That’s almost a cry for help. Maybe that’s why no one else is liking it.

3. Posting one thing right after another. Your fns may love you, but long post after post after post in the newsfeed can be a bit much.  Be sure to space out your updatesso there’s a better chance people will engage with them rather than pass them by.

2. Spelling errors. As small as they might be, spelling errors can really hurt your Page’s credibility.  A typo is okay, but lots of typos are not.  Watch for some common misspellings such as there/their/they’re; your/you’re/yore.

1. Not filling out necessary information: location, description, picture, etc. Facebook gives you the opportunity to add detailed information about yourself.  Be sure to fill it out fully so recruiters, hiring managers and that long lost friend that has the perfect lead for a job can find you.  Concerned about privacy?  You should be.  You can set the right balance by simply keeping the information you share on Facebook strictly professional.

Your Turn:  What Facebook idiot moves have you seen?

By no means is our list of idiot moves on Facebook complete.  I look forward to sharing with our readers the idiot Facebook moves you have witnessed.  I will post your responses in next week’s blog.

Bottom Line:  You don’t have to be an idiot on Facebook.  Smart Job Searchers are aware of the importance of a good Facebook image.  So be aware of those things that may make you look like an idiot on Facebook. Are you guilty of doing any of the top 5?  Well, as a Smart Job Searcher, now that you know it may be a good time to stop.